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We are pleased to offer a new 'Equipment' forum - if you have any questions about which is the best boule, how to chose the right boule, whether to use hard or soft boules, here's the place to post your questions

Rebound

Posted by: j walker) at 2006-06-07 19:14:10
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do harder balls always have more rebound than softer boules or do other factors come into effect - thanks

Rebound

Posted by: Don Nairn) at 2006-06-07 20:32:44
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I am going to be a little controversial and suggest that the advice I obtained from a bocce player may be relevant. Shooting in bocce is more dramatic than shooting in petanque.

Soft balls bounce a lot less.

For shooting if your balls don’t bounce so the chances of getting a good hit (not bouncing over the top) are increased assuming you occasionally play a less than perfect shot.

For a ball to be low bounce the softness has to be an overall property and not just surface softness.

I will suggest that it is possible to play well with any balls but having the good equipment will be a little more forgiving if you make an error.

If you really wish to improve you game find a good coach and practice more.

Rebound

Posted by: Ray Ager) at 2006-06-08 17:05:42
Posting has been displayed 1151 times

I think the sort answer would have to be ‘Yes’. However, VMS boules have internal ribbing that acts as a “shock absorber”, allowing them to have a lower rebound but with a longer lasting harder boule.

Remember as well that low-bounce, low-rebound boules can offer an advantage to pointers as well as shooters, particularly on harder, stony terrains, where boules can be deflected more easily.

Regards,

ray

Rebound

Posted by: N Brown) at 2006-06-26 07:27:33
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I think your advice is probably the most useful of any that I have seen. If players spent as much time and energy practicing and perfecting their boule delivery technique as they do worrying about ball compound, 1mm here or 10 grams there, there game would improve far more quickly. Technique makes up the largest percentage of the equation for a good player. Mental preparation is next then strategy and ball choice. Without a good technique all the others are a waste of time really. So as you said, find a coach, ask someone for help and practice, practice, practice to improve your boule delivery.

Rebound

Posted by: N Brown) at 2006-06-26 07:28:02
Posting has been displayed 1104 times

I think your advice is probably the most useful of any that I have seen. If players spent as much time and energy practicing and perfecting their boule delivery technique as they do worrying about ball compound, 1mm here or 10 grams there, there game would improve far more quickly. Technique makes up the largest percentage of the equation for a good player. Mental preparation is next then strategy and ball choice. Without a good technique all the others are a waste of time really. So as you said, find a coach, ask someone for help and practice, practice, practice to improve your boule delivery.

Rebound

Posted by: Dave Lang) at 2006-08-13 15:47:11
Posting has been displayed 959 times

My wife and I played bocce for awhile until I “discovered” petanque. We acquired several set of boules. All are either 71mm or 72mm with a weight of 700gm, 710gm and 720gm. One set has a hardness or 140kg/mm2. The others are 120kg/mm2.

I did some experimenting to see if there was any noticeable difference in rebound among the various boules on our normal laying surface which is a hard bocce court at our local park. I tried to shoot at fairly close range so the I could pretty constant hits at various angles and percent of contact.

What I found was that there is little difference between the boules. The hard boule seems to rebound about the same at the softer VMS boule. I suspect that that the most important factor in rebound is probably the skill and technique of the player.

One more thing I noticed. It seems that the stainless (INOX) boules tend to form fewer of those tiny sharp splinters that can cut you then the carbon steel boules. (ouch!)

Rebound

Posted by: Jeff widen) at 2006-08-15 11:00:34
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You can see a noticeable difference in the rebound qualities between a very soft boule (i.e. bronze AC Integrale) and a very hard stainless steel boule by dropping both, at the same time, upon a hard surface (marble works well) and seeing how high each boule bounces upwards.

I've tried this experiment and there is definitely a difference in the rebound qualities between very soft and very hard boules. BUT, when comparing 2 boules of closer hardness factors, the difference is not as distinct.

That said, the worth of a soft boule for a shorter rebound depends on other factors beyond metal-to-metal rebounds, namely, the coefficient of friction between the target boule and the terrain surface - the amount of back-spin (if any) and the angle of attack.

Rebound

Posted by: David Erickson) at 2014-10-27 11:54:52
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If a hard boule stikes a soft boule and both boules have the same weight, the rebound will be the same as if the soft boule struck the hard boule. Simple physics, conservation of energy and momentum. The collision is not perfectly elastic because the soft ball gets deformed and some of the energy is converted to heat. If two hard balls strike one another, the collision is more elastic and the rebound is greater. If two soft balls strike one another, the collision is less elastic and the rebound is less.

The question I have is how to tell whether the boule I am throwing or targeting is hard or soft. Is there any chart or general guideline to identify the hardness of a competition boule from its markings?

Rebound

Posted by: Raymond Ager) at 2014-10-27 12:13:11
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Competition boules are not specifically marked to indicate their hardness. Basically, you have to know the hardness from the manufacturer's catalogue or website.

Although there is no requirement to indicate the hardness on the boule, some names do indicate the hardness, e.g. Prestige 110, Inox 115, Match 120, etc.

Over time, softer boules do mark more, so the appearance can also be an indication.

Regards.


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